What Can I Do To Ensure I Don’t Buy From A Puppy Farm?

Assured Breeder SchemeIf you were to see a puppy farmer’s premises you would probably find it quite easy to see that the conditions are not adequate or acceptable, particularly if you asked to see their kennelling conditions.

However, most puppy farmers will transport their puppies across the country to dealers, who then sell them from the internet, pet shops, free newspapers or even motorway service stations and this makes it a lot more difficult to identify where the puppy originated from.

But there are some simple steps you can follow, to help you ensure you do not help fuel this cruel trade:

DO

  • Ask to see the puppy’s mother, which should be present.
  • See the puppy in its breeding environment and ask to look at the kennelling conditions, if they were not raised within the breeder’s house. If you suspect the conditions are not right, then do not buy the puppy.
  • For a pedigree puppy always go to a reliable and reputable Kennel Club Assured Breeders which you can find here. If you want to find breeders currently with puppies visit the Kennel Club's Find a Puppy website here. Assured Breeders will appear at the top of the search with purple scheme logos next to their name. Click here for more information on the Kennel Club Assured Breeder Scheme, or call 0844 463 3980.
  • Be prepared to be put on a waiting list – a healthy puppy is well-worth waiting for.
  • Ask if you can return the puppy if things don’t work out. Responsible and reputable breeders will always say yes.
  • Be suspicious of a breeder selling more than one (maximum two) breeds, unless you are sure of their credentials.
  • Consider alternatives to buying a pedigree puppy like getting a rescue dog or pup. Click here to find a breed rescue puppy.

DON’T

  • Buy a puppy from a pet shop – these have often come from puppy farms.
  • Pick your puppy up from a ‘neutral location’ such as a car park or motorway service station. This is a common tactic used by puppy farm dealers.
  • Buy a puppy because you feel like you’re rescuing it. You’ll only be making space available for another poorly pup to fill.
  • Be fooled by a Kennel Club pedigree certificate. These are often faked by puppy farmers who are already operating illegally and have no qualms about forging paperwork. The majority of puppy farmers will not register their litters with the Kennel Club. If in doubt check with the Kennel Club.

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Only buy a puppy if:

  • You can see puppy interacting with mum
  • It's a breeder recommended by the Kennel Club (preferably Assured Breeder)
  • It's a rescue centre that's a registered charity

Be suspicious of a puppy farmed pup if:

  • Mum isn't there (she's most likely miles away on cruel puppy farm)
  • You're told mum's at the vet, been run over, sick, basically anywhere else
  • Price is either very cheap (£100-£350) or very expensive (£2000-£7000)
  • Pup is being sold in a pet shop or garden centre
  • Pup is sold from website, Friday Ad, motorway service station, pub
  • You're offered free delivery